UNSESCO-site Todaiji Nandaimon in Nara, Japan.  Photo: REX
UNSESCO-site Todaiji Nandaimon in Nara, Japan. Photo: REX

Kingston University architecture students build Japanese temple gate

Japanese temples are not a common sight in London, however, KU students are re-creating Japan’s oldest wooden construction at Kingston Hill.

The third year BA Architecture students will spicen up Dorich House’s garden over the summer with a miniature of UNESCO-site Todaiji Nandaimon built in 1199.

Architecture student Nathalie Wathne, 22, recommended people to come and have a look.

She said: “It really is a fascinating building. I am excited to see the final product after two weeks of intense working.”

Grant Codrai, Hind Alkaabi and Sutthinee Jaroonsote making components. Photo: KU Architecture Team

Grant Codrai, Hind Alkaabi and Sutthinee Jaroonsote making components. Photo: KU Architecture Team

The re-creation is the third year BA Architecture students’ main project this year. 

Wathne said: “We are building it completely from scratch, so we are working really long days for two weeks now. But it’s so worth it. It’s a great learning experience.” 

The students made a 1:25 model of the temple gate. Photo: KU Architecture Team

The students made a 1:25 model of the temple gate. Photo: KU Architecture Team

In October the 22 aspiring architects went to Japan to study temple rooftops and they have previously visited UNESCO-sites in Leeds, Bosnia, India and Rome and Venice in Italy.

“Everything we do on this course relate to UNESCO World Heritage sites, which is such a good theme. We learn a lot about different cultures,” the third year student said.

The exotic temple gate will be a part of the event series titled ‘History in the Making: 140 Years of Kingston School of Art’ and is collaboration with Stanley Picker Gallery.

A sketch of how the temple gate will decorate Dorich House's garden.  Photo: KU Architecture Team

A sketch of how the temple gate will decorate Dorich House’s garden. Photo: KU Architecture Team

It will be open to the public from February 19.

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