Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry review

The new documentary Billie Eilish: The World’s A Little Blurry was released as an Apple Original film on February 26. It is a deep dive into the singer’s debut tour and her life between ages 16 to 18.

I thought that this documentary was incredible. Sometimes music documentaries can be too heavily focused on a concert, but the Billie Eilish documentary has so much to it.

Along with videos from various concerts, there is behind-the-scenes footage of the filming  of her music videos, radio show interview clips, and old home videos from her childhood. There are  videos of her and Finneas O’Connell, her brother, writing and producing the songs, along with interviews with Billie, Finneas and their parents.

She’s still a teenager, we forget that sometimes because Billie Eilish is a huge celebrity. But watching footage of Billie and her brother making up a ridiculous handshake and laughing about it really brings that point home.

She was 16 and 17 years old during the documentary, going on world tours while still managing to learn how to drive and graduate from school. Watching the documentary felt more like watching a coming-of-age film about a famous singer.

The director R. J. Cutler used footage taken by the singer’s parents as well as cameras positioned in their house for Billie and Finneas to switch on when they wanted. Having this mix of footage helped make Billie Eilish appear down to earth and more human than if it was all professionally filmed.

Finneas said: “I think she’s terrified of anything that she makes being hated.” Which is such a good insight into the singer because that’s something we can all relate to.

One topic they touched on in the documentary was the controversy surrounding Billie Eilish’s music. Some critics think that it’s too dark and there shouldn’t be any references to suicide. But Billie responded saying: “I’m never feeling happy. So why would I write about things I don’t know about?”

It also included special appearances from Justin Bieber, Orlando Bloom, Katy Perry and a section of Ariana Grande’s Coachella performance.

The documentary is two hours and 20 minutes long, available on Apple TV and YouTube now.

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